STARCANADA 2017 Concurrent Session - Automated Testing from the Trenches: A Developer’s View of TDD, ATDD, and Other Techniques | TechWell

SEE PRICING & PACKAGES

Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 11:30am to 12:30pm

Automated Testing from the Trenches: A Developer’s View of TDD, ATDD, and Other Techniques

Add to calendar

Writing tests is easy; continuing to write tests in the face of a growing codebase and looming deadlines is hard. We’ve all been there: This project was going to be different—we decided to use test-driven development, and this time there weren’t going to be any bugs. Suddenly we are two weeks from launch and our software is a house of cards. What went wrong? Successful software evolves and grows, so it's imperative that our test strategy grow with it. Understanding the limits of a testing approach and when to switch gears is critical for maintaining confidence in quality. Kyle Thomson presents a developer’s view of various automated testing techniques and how they stand up to growing complexity. Kyle looks at the practical strengths and limitations of several popular testing methodologies, including test-driven development and acceptance test-driven development, and discusses how each one scales with rapid growth through case studies from his personal experience. Leave this session with real-world tips on what automation test strategies to apply, how to identify when your test strategy is failing, and how to adapt your test strategy with your software.

Kyle_Thomson
Amazon

Kyle Thomson is a senior engineer who spent a decade writing large-scale trading applications for banks before joining Amazon’s AWS SDK team. Testing and software quality have always been a focus for Kyle, and he’s driven adoption of TDD, BDD, and other testing techniques across many teams. The transition from application developer to library developer has given him a newfound appreciation of the fact that there isn’t a one-size-fits-all testing strategy, and quality is the overarching goal. The majority of Kyle’s experience is in JVM languages, but he’s also written (and tested) enterprise software in Python, Perl, Objective-C, and Ruby.